nprbooks
nprbooks:

Hi the-wayfaring-stranger! Here’s what NPR Books tumblrer Petra and librarian/Pop Culture Happy Hour panelist Margaret Willison (aka thepierglass) recommend:
Petra -

"Tell them to read the ‘Dark is Rising’ series by Susan Cooper – that’s a classic.  Depending on how mature she is she might be ready for Mercedes Lackey’s ‘Arrows of the Queen’ series … those are cheesetacular but god I loved them, and the first one at least is easy reading. The second two have S.E.X. in them so it depends on whether the kid is ready. "

Margaret -

In addition to THE DARK IS RISING books, Lloyd Alexander’s ‘Chronicles of Prydain’ (starting with The Book of Three) are a perfect fit — they are basically The Lord of the Rings but for 11-year-olds. 
IF she likes the warm humor and tweaked fairy tale vibe of The Hobbit: Patricia C. Wrede’s ‘Enchanted Forest Chronicles,’ starting with Dealing with Dragons, would suit well.
If she likes the more serious world building and retooled folklore aspect, Grace Lin’s Where the Mountain Meets the Moon and A Starry River of Sky could be great, as could Shannon Hale’s Books of Bayern, starting with The Goose Girl.

Petra actually got very excited about this and came back to add that Tamora Pierce’s Song of the Lioness quartet is essential reading for any 11-year-old girl (and best experienced at that age, due to the, uhh, choppy writing in the early volumes).
Hope this helps!

nprbooks:

Hi the-wayfaring-stranger! Here’s what NPR Books tumblrer Petra and librarian/Pop Culture Happy Hour panelist Margaret Willison (aka thepierglass) recommend:

Petra -

"Tell them to read the ‘Dark is Rising’ series by Susan Cooper – that’s a classic.  Depending on how mature she is she might be ready for Mercedes Lackey’s ‘Arrows of the Queen’ series … those are cheesetacular but god I loved them, and the first one at least is easy reading. The second two have S.E.X. in them so it depends on whether the kid is ready. "

Margaret -

In addition to THE DARK IS RISING books, Lloyd Alexander’s ‘Chronicles of Prydain’ (starting with The Book of Three) are a perfect fit — they are basically The Lord of the Rings but for 11-year-olds. 

IF she likes the warm humor and tweaked fairy tale vibe of The Hobbit: Patricia C. Wrede’s ‘Enchanted Forest Chronicles,’ starting with Dealing with Dragons, would suit well.

If she likes the more serious world building and retooled folklore aspect, Grace Lin’s Where the Mountain Meets the Moon and A Starry River of Sky could be great, as could Shannon Hale’s Books of Bayern, starting with The Goose Girl.

Petra actually got very excited about this and came back to add that Tamora Pierce’s Song of the Lioness quartet is essential reading for any 11-year-old girl (and best experienced at that age, due to the, uhh, choppy writing in the early volumes).

Hope this helps!

guernicamag
A lot of the time with female protagonists, they are there to be fallen in love with or to fall in love with someone. I really wanted to steer away from that and just have [my female protagonist] as a solid person rather than a victim—someone who’s been victimized and is all broken from that, or the other cliché, which is someone who’s been made stronger. You know, you get it in all the pop songs. “Thanks so much for smashing my face in, I’m much stronger now,” that sort of thing.
americanguide

americanguide:

TENNESSEE WATERSHED 

Photographer Jeff Rich is recording American watersheds for his WPA style project, The Watershed Project. He sends photos from the Tennessee River for AG Week Field Assignment #8: Waterways:

The French Broad is one of two major tributaries to the Tennessee River. Continuing down the system of watersheds that make up the southeastern quarter of the Mississippi River Basin, this portion of the Watershed project examines the Tennessee River Basin. A system of rivers that is for the most part controlled and ultimately harnessed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. A government organization started in 1933 that provides flood control, navigation on the rivers, economic development, and finally electric power production. The TVA operates nearly 50 dams in the Tennessee Watershed, as well as 18 power plants, and 3 nuclear plants.

The original Tennessee guidebook writes of The Tennessee Valley Authority: 

The Tennessee Valley Authority was created by Congress in 1933 to develop the Tennessee River system in the interest of navigation, flood control, and national defense, and to generate and sell surplus electricity to avert waste of water power. … In its program for flood and navigation control, for land reclamation, and for cheap electric light and power the TVA is substituting order and design for haphazard, unplanned, and unintegrated development. Through its social and educational activities it is bringing to this region a consciousness of its own rich natural and human resources. … For this, as well as its more tangible objectives, the TVA is of national importance.

Tennessee, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1939)

Guide Note:See more of The Watershed Project here.

° ° °

Jeff Rich is a photographer based in Iowa City. His work focuses on water issues ranging from recreation and sustainability to exploitation and abuse. Jeff currently teaches photography at The University of Iowa. He also produces “Eyes on the South" for The Oxford American.

Follow him on his website at jeffreyrich.com and on Twitter at @jeffreymrich.